Floating Pool in New York’s East River

Plus Pool Project New YorkIf you are from New York or have family there, you know most people wouldn’t even consider swimming in the East River. What about a pool filled with water from the river? Forget about it. But what if the pool floated in the river, and it’s walls filtrated all the bacteria and contaminants from the river water? Well, now you might just end up with a swimmable pool!

That’s exactly what the folks Family and Play Lab are counting on. Meet the + Pool. Shaped like a giant plus symbol, it will actually be four pools in one: a kids pool, sports pool, lap pool, and lounge pool. Like a giant strainer dropped into the river, + POOL will make it possible for everybody to swim in clean river water in NYC.

It began as a simple idea amongst three friends, who quickly realized they weren’t the only ones who wanted to see the project come to fruition. In just six days, they raised $41,000 surpassing their goal of $25,000. Soon after, a team was then assembled of designers, engineers, environmental consultants, planners, project managers, and fabricators. The initial backing money allowed the team to start testing water filtration materials and gather water quality data for the project.

Funding for the project has been as inventive as the pool itself. Since the pool will contain 70,000 tiles, supporters can purchase tiles and have their names engraved on it to be permanently placed it the pool. There are different levels of tiles to purchase starting at $25.00 (group tile containing seven names) all the way up to $9999.00 (limited edition marble tile).

Primarily using funding via Kickstarter, it’s on its way to becoming one of the largest crowd-funded civic projects the world has ever seen, and the fact that everybody can be a part of getting + POOL into the water is both incredible and absolutely central to the project. The hope is not only to provide a recreational area for New Yorkers to go to, but to also change the way New Yorkers view and take care of the rivers surrounding Manhattan.

The team recently achieved its funding goal of $250,000.00 to move the next phase of the project which will be to build a floating lab, essentially a miniature version of the pool to test filtration and allow everyone to see and learn how the pool will help clean the river and provide a fun place for families to visit.

The project has a long way to go, but the hope is to open the pool by 2016, just in time for the Olympics. If it is a success, it may just change how cities across the country and the world look at rivers and lakes, and inspire them to clean and take care of the water around them. To learn more about this incredible civic project, visit www.pluspool.org.

Protecting Your Hair From Chlorine

In Arizona, a swimming pool is almost a necessity if you are going to spend anytime outdoors. But for many, the chlorine in the water can damage or even change the color of their hair. But there are a few steps you can take to help avoid damage to your hair that chlorine.

Step 1: If possible, rinse your hair in the shower before getting in the pool. If your hair is “filled up” with tap water it won’t be able to absorb as much chlorinated pool water.

Step 2: Apply a thorough coating of a hair serum to your dripping wet hair, paying special attention to the ends. The serum will help protect your hair from friction while your swim. Choose an inexpensive serum like John Frieda Frizz-Ease Original Serum, $7.50.

Step 3: (Optional) Put on a swim cap. Many swim caps are so tight that they pull your hair out when you take them on and off. Try a Speedo Silicone Swim Cap, $7.99. If a swim cap causes you to lose hair, don’t use it. Just let your strands hang free instead.

Step 4: After you swim, rinse your hair with tap water again. It’s best to wear a hat if you plan to stay in the sun after you exit the pool.

Step 5: Always shampoo your hair after you’re done swimming for the day. It’s important to use a shampoo that gets rid of chlorine and mineral build up. If your regular shampoo contains EDTA or Phytic Acid it will provide thorough enough cleansing. If your regular shampoo doesn’t contain EDTA or Phytic Acid, buy UltraSwim Chlorine Removal Shampoo, $15.21 for a pack of 4 ($4.99 each MSRP) for pool days.

Here Comes The Sun?

In the days of fun and sun, it only make sense that pool companies would try to develop products to harness solar-energy. However, it seems the pool industry has been somewhat slow embracing the use of solar power. Part of the hesitancy stems from the mid-90’s when there was a big push for solar products. And while the sales were good, it turns out most of the products just didn’t work very well.

Flash forward twenty years later, and the products have improved, especially in the case of photovoltaics, or solar-electric power. While solar power has long been used to heat pools with passive, low-tech solar heaters, photovotaics are creating ways to supply power for devices ranging from LED lighting and floating debris skimmers all the way up to wall-mounted chlorine generators and even pool pumps.

Take for instance a solar-powered pump that is being provided American West Windmill and Solar, the master distributor stateside for German-made Lorentz Solar Pumps. “The beautiful marriage between them is that when there’s a lot of sunlight, that’s when you really want to be moving water through the filtration system, and that’s when your pump is going to be running at its peak,” says Cody Locknane, American West’s national sales manager. “A lot of people package the systems, but that’s not a requirement.”

However, going green isn’t cheap. The cost for a solar-powered pump can range from $4000 to $5000 and many are hesitant to make that kind of investment. But manufacturers maintain that the cost can be offset by two factors: savings from lower energy bills and 30 percent federal tax credit, which is slated to remain in place through 2016. This is especially true in states with high energy costs like California and Hawaii.

In the meantime though, pool owners may be more inclined to take advantage of other solar-powered products such as LED lights, in-pool chlorinators, and pool skimmers. But expansion in the solar arena for pool products is slow at best, leaving many to wonder what the future holds for solar products.

John Stiglmeier, president of RecWaterTec, which offers a solar-powered mineral purifier had this to say, “I think the pool and spa trade has been slow to respond to innovation in general. It’s just not an industry that embraces change. But things are changing, and the people in the pool industry who get out ahead of it are going to be the ones who’ll have the best opportunity to be successful. Consumers will drive this change.”

Water inside pool… Good. Water under pool… Bad.

Lifted Pool
Spring is almost here and many Arizonans are excited for the warm weather. For many of us, this includes shorts, flip flops, sunscreen and most importantly, a swimming pool. Residents begin preparing their pools for our long and hot seasons and for those without a pool, a friend with a pool is a friend indeed! As we prepare here in the West, the Midwest prepares to continue fighting their cold winter storms.

For many residents in a small town named Leslie, located in Georgia, their main issue has been the heavy rain. Many flood warnings have been issued for the last several days and the weather is just beginning to clear up. Unfortunately, for one pool, the heavy rain had finally taken its toll. The 20 feet by 60 feet fully concrete pool, had managed to be lifted from the ground. Half of the pool is dislodged, while the brick around it is cracked and broken. As heavy as the concrete pool may seem, the power of the heavy rain was enough to raise the pool from the surface! The homeowners could not believe that rain could do such a thing.

While doubtful we will have the issue of too much rain in Arizona, it’s still a good idea to check your pumps and pool equipment regularly. If you have any issues or are considering upgrading your pool, please contact the professionals at Platinum Pools today.