Geothermal Pool Heating

If you you decide to heat your pool in the winter you have a few options. Gas/propane pool heaters, air source heat pumps, solar heat pumps, or geothermal pool heat pumps. Today we are going to talk about the last option, geothermal heating.

How geothermal pool heat pumps work is by basically collecting heat from the ground. Temperatures above ground can vary wildly in the winter but underground it generally remains a constant 70° F. By collecting heat through a series of underground loops, geothermal heat pumps can utilize that warm temperature by concentrating that heat and applying it where necessary. This can be quite beneficial as the pumps are good for the environment, are extremely efficient, and are much less expensive to operate. This can save you money on your energy bill.

Geothermal heating is also less conspicuous than other heating options. Gas or propane heaters require the installation of a tank and solar panels are bulky and require a lot of space. With geothermal heating, most of the equipment is underground so you are provide more space around your property.

While the initial investment of geothermal heating is generally 30-40% more expensive than other heating options, that money will quickly be recouped in operating costs which is 70-85% lower than other pumps. Geothermal is also a long lasting system with most warranties averaging about 10 years.

If you have questions about heating options for your pool, please contact the professionals at Platinum Pools of Arizona
(480) 888-9200 – East Valley or (623) 847-9200 – West Valley.

Floating Pool in New York’s East River

Plus Pool Project New YorkIf you are from New York or have family there, you know most people wouldn’t even consider swimming in the East River. What about a pool filled with water from the river? Forget about it. But what if the pool floated in the river, and it’s walls filtrated all the bacteria and contaminants from the river water? Well, now you might just end up with a swimmable pool!

That’s exactly what the folks Family and Play Lab are counting on. Meet the + Pool. Shaped like a giant plus symbol, it will actually be four pools in one: a kids pool, sports pool, lap pool, and lounge pool. Like a giant strainer dropped into the river, + POOL will make it possible for everybody to swim in clean river water in NYC.

It began as a simple idea amongst three friends, who quickly realized they weren’t the only ones who wanted to see the project come to fruition. In just six days, they raised $41,000 surpassing their goal of $25,000. Soon after, a team was then assembled of designers, engineers, environmental consultants, planners, project managers, and fabricators. The initial backing money allowed the team to start testing water filtration materials and gather water quality data for the project.

Funding for the project has been as inventive as the pool itself. Since the pool will contain 70,000 tiles, supporters can purchase tiles and have their names engraved on it to be permanently placed it the pool. There are different levels of tiles to purchase starting at $25.00 (group tile containing seven names) all the way up to $9999.00 (limited edition marble tile).

Primarily using funding via Kickstarter, it’s on its way to becoming one of the largest crowd-funded civic projects the world has ever seen, and the fact that everybody can be a part of getting + POOL into the water is both incredible and absolutely central to the project. The hope is not only to provide a recreational area for New Yorkers to go to, but to also change the way New Yorkers view and take care of the rivers surrounding Manhattan.

The team recently achieved its funding goal of $250,000.00 to move the next phase of the project which will be to build a floating lab, essentially a miniature version of the pool to test filtration and allow everyone to see and learn how the pool will help clean the river and provide a fun place for families to visit.

The project has a long way to go, but the hope is to open the pool by 2016, just in time for the Olympics. If it is a success, it may just change how cities across the country and the world look at rivers and lakes, and inspire them to clean and take care of the water around them. To learn more about this incredible civic project, visit www.pluspool.org.

Protecting Your Hair From Chlorine

In Arizona, a swimming pool is almost a necessity if you are going to spend anytime outdoors. But for many, the chlorine in the water can damage or even change the color of their hair. But there are a few steps you can take to help avoid damage to your hair that chlorine.

Step 1: If possible, rinse your hair in the shower before getting in the pool. If your hair is “filled up” with tap water it won’t be able to absorb as much chlorinated pool water.

Step 2: Apply a thorough coating of a hair serum to your dripping wet hair, paying special attention to the ends. The serum will help protect your hair from friction while your swim. Choose an inexpensive serum like John Frieda Frizz-Ease Original Serum, $7.50.

Step 3: (Optional) Put on a swim cap. Many swim caps are so tight that they pull your hair out when you take them on and off. Try a Speedo Silicone Swim Cap, $7.99. If a swim cap causes you to lose hair, don’t use it. Just let your strands hang free instead.

Step 4: After you swim, rinse your hair with tap water again. It’s best to wear a hat if you plan to stay in the sun after you exit the pool.

Step 5: Always shampoo your hair after you’re done swimming for the day. It’s important to use a shampoo that gets rid of chlorine and mineral build up. If your regular shampoo contains EDTA or Phytic Acid it will provide thorough enough cleansing. If your regular shampoo doesn’t contain EDTA or Phytic Acid, buy UltraSwim Chlorine Removal Shampoo, $15.21 for a pack of 4 ($4.99 each MSRP) for pool days.

How Swimming Can Reduce Health Care Costs

In a recent white paper by Dr. Tom Lachocki, CEO of the National Swimming Pool Foundation, Dr. Lachocki discusses how poor exercise habits, obesity, soaring healthcare costs and drowning — are related. In the paper, Dr Lachocki lays out a path toward a healthy and physically active society with fewer tragic water-related deaths and reduced healthcare costs.

Dr Lachocki outlines how physical inactivity, an aging baby boomer society, and obesity will continue to drive up healthcare costs and suggests that aquatic activity is a perfect solution for addressing these issues.

His position makes a great deal of sense, especially for senior citizens and people struggling with obesity. After all, water’s buoyancy reduces stress on joints and reduces risk of falls and injury. Additionally, he states, “Water’s mass increases cardiac and respiratory exercise, making aquatic activity ideal for historically sedentary and aging populations.”

With regards to health care costs, it also makes sense that healthier older adults and fewer obese people would bring down health care costs.

In the end, Dr Lachocki concludes “Pool, spa, and aquatic businesses, associations, health focused
organizations, and government must commit to supporting organizations that teach people to swim. More
swimmers will result in a healthier society, fewer drownings, and reduced healthcare costs, with more people engaged in a healthy spectrum of aquatic activities.”

If you would like to read the entire paper, please click here.

Platinum Pools couldn’t agree more and we are proud of our recent involvement in providing 500 free swimming lessons for children in Arizona.

Hey, Let’s Swim to Work!

Platinum Pools & SpasAs unusual though it may sound, the city of London is considering a proposal that would turn the 8.6-mile Regents Canal into a swimming lane, allowing Londoners to swim to work. In the winter, the designers imagine ice-skating.

The proposal is one of several being considered as part of a competition staged by the city’s mayor and London’s Landscape Museum. London is looking for way to turn some of its industrial artifacts into useable public facilities. In this case, the Regent Canal, which was built more than 200 years ago for the purpose of transporting materials throughout the city’s then-burgeoning industrial district, would become an aquatic thoroughfare where residents would swim from place to place, presumably as new type of commuter lane.

Read more about this idea here!